Thursday, February 6, 2020

Materials & Manufacturing Process Selection Case Study - 1

Materials & Manufacturing Process Selection - Case Study Example The CES Edupack software is normally used to select the most suitable material for the brake disc. Several factors are considered when choosing a material for brake disc. These include the specific gravity of the material, thermal conductivity, wear resistance and the materials cost per unit volume. This research work focuses on the design of the brake disc and the entire brake assembly, the most commonly used material in the design and the calculations that are involved in the brake system. This research is supposed to sufficiently inform the King Swan Engineering Firm on the brake disc. The Company may, therefore, use the knowledge derived from this report to improve on the current existing brake disc. The brake disc is a metallic wheel in a brake system against which the brake pad rub. As the pad is pushed against the disc, heat is generated. The disc should there have the capacity to withstand the heat due to friction. The function of the disc is to stop the vehicle when it comes into contact with the brake pads. The brake disc is connected to the vehicles tire by means of bolts and nuts. The brake pads are normally pushed against the disc via the brake calipers. The brake discs are commonly made of grey cast irons. The cast iron, however, has some shortcomings such as high specific gravity and high heat conductivity. Application of brake discs is traced back to early 1890’s. The disc was first discovered by a scientist known as Fredrick William. The brake discs have better performance as compared to wheel drums. This is attributed to the fact that brake discs come with ventilation holes through which air circulates to the entire disc. The brake disc is composed of a brak e disc bolted to the axle or hub of the wheel hubs and the housing called calipers. The calipers. The calipers are connected to the axle casting in two parts. Each of the parts has a piston. In between the piston and the disc, there is a friction pad

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

The Evolution of the Graphic Industry Essay Example for Free

The Evolution of the Graphic Industry Essay The development and continuous improvement of technology has incessantly provided new professional fields that emerged to cater to the intensification brought about by the web explosion and digital breakthroughs in the industry. The creative spectrum in the graphic industry has open doors to a large number of occupations which careers may in some way or another extend beyond one particular expertise. Visual communication is the medium used by the artists to provide people the distinction between graphic design, fine art and even advertising art. Different industries that make use of visual tools most of the time utilize almost the same theories, principles, practices, languages and even elements in delivering their client’s needs. The book â€Å"A history of graphic design† conveys that the industry’s main essence is to provide arrangement to information, form to designs, feelings and expressions to a work of art which primary output is the documentation of human experience (Meggs, 1983). The graphic industry’s professional fields have high-racketed immensely that make way to the diversity of graphic designing jobs. The workforce in the graphic design business which holds the management related roles are creative directors, art directors and art production managers. Hands-on designers in the fields are logo designers, brand identity developers, visual image developers, illustrators, content developers, multimedia developer, visual journalists and layout artists. The web explosion and advancement opened its doors to interface layout artists and web designers usually employed by web development companies. Web design may entail collaboration of graphic designers and software engineers. Programmers are also in demand in the field of web development to provide their expertise in doing advance coding. Web masters are positions that specialize in both programming and web design. While traditional graphic design and interactive design both adhere to provide better physical facade, the two have distinguished characteristics from the other. At all times, traditional graphic design’s main purpose is to carry out an attractive application of an object. It is relatively eye-catching and bold. The layout of this kind of design deals primarily with the style treatment and array of a print’s content. The interactive design on the other hand, is mainly the design used in appliances, machines, CD software applications, mobile communications, computers and even websites which focus intensively on the user interaction and experience. It aims to proficiently deliver to a user an interaction that is both efficient and simple. Interactive design is also referred to as user-centered design. Traditional graphic design is utilized to please the eyes of each and every observer. It is highly used in logo design whereas it uses a process of sketching through thumbnails and rough drafts prior to hybrid process (Gregory 48). Interactive design process balances the visual elements with regards to the operational mode and the functionality of the system to make it usable and make it easily adjust to the user’s changing requirements and needs. Interactive design is widely used in the web. Web page designs give the internet users an active role in accessing what they need online. The more user-friendly a site is the more it is visited. The interactive design reflects lucid pathways to the information, products and tools a user necessitates. Design is fundamental to the success of most services and products released by a company. Both the graphic and the interactive design of a product and affect the consumer experience which directly and enormously affects the business success or failure. The profound impact of design is apparent as dictated by the developments in technology. Works Cited Gregory Thomas, How to Design Logos, Symbols and Icons: 24 Internationally Renowned Studios Reveal How They Develop Trademarks for Print and New Media, April 2003, pp:48 Meggs, Philip B. , A history of graphic design. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1983

Monday, January 20, 2020

The Use of ERGs for Early Glaucoma Detection :: Medicine Medical Medicinal Essays

The Use of ERGs for Early Glaucoma Detection Glaucoma is a degenerative disease which can be caused by high intraocular pressure (IOP) (Glaucoma, 2002). This IOP arises in the aqueous humor, the area between the cornea and the iris, where a drainage system allows the aqueous to drain from this area and recycle (Learn about Glaucoma, 2002). A specific balance of the production and removal of aqueous determines the IOP. Either malfunction or malformation of this drainage system can cause a rise in pressure. The elevated pressure causes irrevocable damage to the optic nerve and retinal fibers as well as damage to the other areas of the visual system, which leads to a gradual and permanent loss of vision if not treated (Glaucoma, 2002). Damage to the optic nerve causes loss of vision because this nerve, or group of ganglion axons, is responsible for transporting images to the brain from the eye. While there are other possible causes of glaucoma, such as variations of the myocilin gene, IOP is thought to be the main cause (Learn abo ut Glaucoma, 2002). Treatment, especially with early detection, can slow or cease continued damage. Types of Glaucoma There are several types of glaucoma, the most prominent types being Open Angle, and Acute Angle Closure and the more infrequent types including Secondary Glaucoma, Congenital Glaucoma, Normal Tension Glaucoma (NTG), and Pigmentary Glaucoma. Open Angle Glaucoma (OAG), the most prevalent form of glaucoma (Glaucoma, 2002), is painless, and can go unnoticed without the help of an optometrist or ophthalmologist. Obstructed drainage channels, which develop over a period of time, characterize this type of glaucoma. These obstructions are not present at the openings of the channels, rather they occur inside the channels. The aqueous cannot recycle because of these obstructed channels, the IOP rises, and damage results (Learn about Glaucoma, 2002). Acute Angle Closure Glaucoma, however, is much more painful and results in rapid vision loss. In this case, the iris and cornea are not wide enough apart which can cause the edge of the iris to block the drainage channels (Learn about Glaucoma; and Glaucoma, 2002). Secondary Glaucoma results from other eye diseases or problems, such as diabetes, trauma, and tumors . Congenital Glaucoma is a rare glaucoma found in infants (Glaucoma, 2002). Normal Tension Glaucoma occurs in those with normal IOP’s but have damage to the optic nerve. Pigmentary Glaucoma results from parts of the pigment in the iris breaking off and slowly clogging the drainage channels. The Use of ERGs for Early Glaucoma Detection :: Medicine Medical Medicinal Essays The Use of ERGs for Early Glaucoma Detection Glaucoma is a degenerative disease which can be caused by high intraocular pressure (IOP) (Glaucoma, 2002). This IOP arises in the aqueous humor, the area between the cornea and the iris, where a drainage system allows the aqueous to drain from this area and recycle (Learn about Glaucoma, 2002). A specific balance of the production and removal of aqueous determines the IOP. Either malfunction or malformation of this drainage system can cause a rise in pressure. The elevated pressure causes irrevocable damage to the optic nerve and retinal fibers as well as damage to the other areas of the visual system, which leads to a gradual and permanent loss of vision if not treated (Glaucoma, 2002). Damage to the optic nerve causes loss of vision because this nerve, or group of ganglion axons, is responsible for transporting images to the brain from the eye. While there are other possible causes of glaucoma, such as variations of the myocilin gene, IOP is thought to be the main cause (Learn abo ut Glaucoma, 2002). Treatment, especially with early detection, can slow or cease continued damage. Types of Glaucoma There are several types of glaucoma, the most prominent types being Open Angle, and Acute Angle Closure and the more infrequent types including Secondary Glaucoma, Congenital Glaucoma, Normal Tension Glaucoma (NTG), and Pigmentary Glaucoma. Open Angle Glaucoma (OAG), the most prevalent form of glaucoma (Glaucoma, 2002), is painless, and can go unnoticed without the help of an optometrist or ophthalmologist. Obstructed drainage channels, which develop over a period of time, characterize this type of glaucoma. These obstructions are not present at the openings of the channels, rather they occur inside the channels. The aqueous cannot recycle because of these obstructed channels, the IOP rises, and damage results (Learn about Glaucoma, 2002). Acute Angle Closure Glaucoma, however, is much more painful and results in rapid vision loss. In this case, the iris and cornea are not wide enough apart which can cause the edge of the iris to block the drainage channels (Learn about Glaucoma; and Glaucoma, 2002). Secondary Glaucoma results from other eye diseases or problems, such as diabetes, trauma, and tumors . Congenital Glaucoma is a rare glaucoma found in infants (Glaucoma, 2002). Normal Tension Glaucoma occurs in those with normal IOP’s but have damage to the optic nerve. Pigmentary Glaucoma results from parts of the pigment in the iris breaking off and slowly clogging the drainage channels.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

Animal Nutrition: Distinguish Macronutrients and Micronutrients Essay

There are seven major classes of nutrients: carbohydrates, fats, fiber, minerals, protein, vitamin, and water. These nutrient classes can be categorized as either macronutrients (needed in relatively large amounts) or micronutrients (needed in smaller quantities). The macronutrients are carbohydrates, fats, fiber, proteins, and water. The micronutrients are minerals and vitamins. The macronutrients (excluding fiber and water) provide structural material (amino acids from which proteins are built, and lipids from which cell membranes and some signaling molecules are built) and energy. Some of the structural material can be used to generate energy internally, and in either case it is measured in joules or calories (sometimes called â€Å"kilocalories† and on other rare occasions written with a capital C to distinguish them from little ‘c’ calories). Carbohydrates and proteins provide 17 kJ approximately (4 kcal) of energy per gram, while fats provide 37 kJ (9 kcal) per gram.,[1] though the net energy from either depends on such factors as absorption and digestive effort, which vary substantially from instance to instance. Vitamins, minerals, fiber, and water do not provide energy, but are required for other reasons. A third class dietary material, fiber (i.e., non-digestible material such as cellulose), seems also to be required, for both mechanical and biochemical reasons, though the exact reasons remain unclear. Molecules of carbohydrates and fats consist of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms. Carbohydrates range from simple monosaccharides (glucose, fructose, galactose) to complex polysaccharides (starch). Fats are triglycerides, made of assorted fatty acid monomers bound to glycerolbackbone. Some fatty acids, but not all, are essential in the diet: they cannot be synthesized in the body. Protein molecules contain nitrogen atoms in addition to carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen. The fundamental components of protein are nitrogen-containing amino acids, some of which areessential in the sense that humans cannot make them internally. Some of the amino acids are convertible (with the expenditure of energy) to glucose and can be used for energy production just as ordinary glucose. By breaking down existing protein, some glucose can be produced internally; the remaining amino acids are discarded, primarily as urea in urine. This occurs normally only during prolonged starvation. Family| Sources| Possible Benefits| flavonoids| berries, herbs, vegetables, wine, grapes, tea| general antioxidant, oxidation of LDLs, prevention of arteriosclerosis and heart disease| isoflavones (phytoestrogens)| soy, red clover, kudzu root| general antioxidant, prevention of arteriosclerosis and heart disease, easing symptoms of menopause, cancer prevention[18]| isothiocyanates| cruciferous vegetables| cancer prevention| monoterpenes| citrus peels, essential oils, herbs, spices, green plants, atmosphere[19]| cancer prevention, treating gallstones| organosulfur compounds| chives, garlic, onions| cancer prevention, lowered LDLs, assistance to the immune system| saponins| beans, cereals, herbs| Hypercholesterolemia, Hyperglycemia, Antioxidant, cancer prevention,Anti-inflammatory| capsaicinoids| all capiscum (chile) peppers| topical pain relief, cancer prevention, cancer cell apoptosis| ————————————————- Carbohydrates Carbohydrates may be classified as monosaccharides, disaccharides, or polysaccharides depending on the number of monomer (sugar) units they contain. They constitute a large part of foods such as rice, noodles, bread, and other grain-based products. Monosaccharides contain one sugar unit, disaccharides two, and polysaccharides three or more. Polysaccharides are often referred to as complex carbohydrates because they are typically long multiple branched chains of sugar units. The difference is that complex carbohydrates take longer to digest and absorb since their sugar units must be separated from the chain before absorption. The spike in blood glucose levels after ingestion of simple sugars is thought to be related to some of the heart and vascular diseases which have become more frequent in recent times. Simple sugars form a greater part of modern diets than formerly, perhaps leading to more cardiovascular disease. The degree of causation is still not clear, however. Fat A molecule of dietary fat typically consists of several fatty acids (containing long chains of carbon and hydrogen atoms), bonded to a glycerol. They are typically found as triglycerides (three fatty acids attached to one glycerol backbone). Fats may be classified as saturated or unsaturateddepending on the detailed structure of the fatty acids involved. Saturated fats have all of the carbon atoms in their fatty acid chains bonded to hydrogen atoms, whereas unsaturated fats have some of these carbon atoms double-bonded, so their molecules have relatively fewer hydrogen atoms than a saturated fatty acid of the same length. Unsaturated fats may be further classified as monounsaturated (one double-bond) or polyunsaturated (many double-bonds). Furthermore, depending on the location of the double-bond in the fatty acid chain, unsaturated fatty acids are classified as omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids. Trans fats are a type of unsaturated fat with trans-isomer bonds; these are rare in nature and in foods from natural sources; they are typically created in an industrial process called (partial) hydrogenation. Many studies have shown that unsaturated fats, particularly monounsaturated fats, are best in the human diet. Saturated fats, typically from animal sources, are next, while trans fats are to be avoided. Saturated and some trans fats are typically solid at room temperature (such as butter orlard), while unsaturated fats are typically liquids (such as olive oil or flaxseed oil). Trans fats are very rare in nature, but have properties useful in the food processing industry, such as rancid resistance.[citation needed] Essential fatty acids Most fatty acids are non-essential, meaning the body can produce them as needed, generally from other fatty acids and always by expending energy to do so. However, in humans at least two fatty acids are essential and must be included in the diet. An appropriate balance of essential fatty acids -— omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids -— seems also important for health, though definitive experimental demonstration has been elusive. Both of these â€Å"omega† long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are substrates for a class of eicosanoids known as prostaglandins, which have roles throughout the human body. They are hormones, in some respects. The omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), which can be made in the human body from the omega-3 essential fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid (LNA), or taken in through marine food sources, serves as a building block for series 3 prostaglandins (e.g. weakly inflammatory PGE3). The omega-6 dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA) serves as a building block for series 1 prostaglandins (e.g. anti-inflammatory PGE1), whereas arachidonic acid (AA) serves as a building block for series 2 prostaglandins (e.g. pro-inflammatory PGE 2). Both DGLA and AA can be made from the omega-6 linoleic acid (LA) in the human body, or can be taken in directly through food. An appropriately balanced intake of omega-3 and omega-6 partly determines the relative production of different prostaglandins: one reason a balance between omega-3 and omega-6 is believed important for cardiovascular health. In industrialized societies, people typically consume large amounts of processed vegetable oils, which have reduced amounts of the essential fatty acids along with too much of omega-6 fatty acids relative to omega-3 fatty acids. The conversion rate of omega-6 DGLA to AA largely determines the production of the prostaglandins PGE1 and PGE2. Omega-3 EPA prevents AA from being released from membran es, thereby skewing prostaglandin balance away from pro-inflammatory PGE2 (made from AA) toward anti-inflammatory PGE1 (made from DGLA). Moreover, the conversion (desaturation) of DGLA to AA is controlled by the enzyme delta-5-desaturase, which in turn is controlled by hormones such as insulin (up-regulation) and glucagon (down-regulation). The amount and type of carbohydrates consumed, along with some types of amino acid, can influence processes involving insulin, glucagon, and other hormones; therefore the ratio of omega-3 versus omega-6 has wide effects on general health, and specific effects on immune function and inflammation, and mitosis (i.e. cell division). Good sources of essential fatty acids include most vegetables, nuts, seeds, and marine oils,[2] Some of the best sources are fish, flax seed oils, soy beans, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, and walnuts. Fiber Dietary fiber is a carbohydrate (or a polysaccharide) that is incompletely absorbed in humans and in some animals. Like all carbohydrates, when it is metabolized it can produce four calories (kilocalories) of energy per gram. But in most circumstances it accounts for less than that because of its limited absorption and digestibility. Dietary fiber consists mainly of cellulose, a large carbohydrate polymer that is indigestible because humans do not have the required enzymes to disassemble it. There are two subcategories: soluble and insoluble fiber. Whole grains, fruits (especiallyplums, prunes, and figs), and vegetables are good sources of dietary fiber. Fiber is important to digestive health and is thought to reduce the risk of colon cancer.[citation needed] For mechanical reasons it can help in alleviating both constipation and diarrhea. Fiber provides bulk to the intestinal contents, and insoluble fiber especially stimulates peristalsis — the rhythmic muscular contractions of the intestines which move digesta along the digestive tract. Some soluble fibers produce a solution of high viscosity; this is essentially a gel, which slows the movement of food through the intestines. Additionally, fiber, perhaps especially that from whole grains, may help lessen insulin spikes and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Protein Proteins are the basis of many animal body structures (e.g. muscles, skin, and hair). They also form the enyzmes which control chemical reactions throughout the body. Each molecule is composed of amino acids which are characterized by inclusion of nitrogen and sometimes sulphur (these components are responsible for the distinctive smell of burning protein, such as the keratin in hair). The body requires amino acids to produce new proteins (protein retention) and to replace damaged proteins (maintenance). As there is no protein or amino acid storage provision, amino acids must be present in the diet. Excess amino acids are discarded, typically in the urine. For all animals, some amino acids are essential (an animal cannot produce them internally) and some are non-essential (the animal can produce them from other nitrogen-containing compounds). About twenty amino acids are found in the human body, and about ten of these are essential, and therefore must be included in the diet. A diet that contains adequate amounts of amino acids (especially those that are essential) is particularly important in some situations: during early development and maturation, pregnancy, lactation, or injury (a burn, for instance). A complete protein source contains all the essential amino acids; an incomplete protein source lacks one or more of the essential amino acids. It is possible to combine two incomplete protein sources (e.g. rice and beans) to make a complete protein source, and characteristic combinations are the basis of distinct cultural cooking traditions. Sources of dietary protein include meats, tofu and other soy-products, eggs, grains, legumes, and dairy products such as milk and cheese. A few amino acids from protein can be converted into glucose and used for fuel through a process called gluconeogenesis; this is done in quantity only during starvation. The amino acids remaining after such conversion are discarded. Vitamins As with the minerals discussed above, some vitamins are recognized as essential nutrients, necessary in the diet for good health. (Vitamin D is the exception: it can alternatively be synthesized in the skin, in the presence of UVB radiation.) Certain vitamin-like compounds that are recommended in the diet, such as carnitine, are thought useful for survival and health, but these are not â€Å"essential† dietary nutrients because the human body has some capacity to produce them from other compounds. Moreover, thousands of different phytochemicals have recently been discovered in food (particularly in fresh vegetables), which may have desirable properties including antioxidant activity (see below); experimental demonstration has been suggestive but inconclusive. Other essential nutrients not classed as vitamins include essential amino acids (see above),choline, essential fatty acids (see above), and the minerals discussed in the preceding section. Vitamin deficiencies may result in disease conditions: goitre, scurvy, osteoporosis, impaired immune system, disorders of cell metabolism, certain forms of cancer, symptoms of premature aging, and poor psychological health (including eating disorders), among many others.[6] Excess of some vitamins is also dangerous to health (notably vitamin A), and for at least one vitamin, B6, toxicity begins at levels not far above the required amount. Deficiency or excess of minerals can also have serious health consequences. Water About 70% of the non-fat mass of the human body is made of water[7] . Analysis of Adipose Tissue in Relation to Body Weight Loss in Man. Retrieved from Journal of Applied To function properly, the body requires between one and seven liters of water per day to avoid dehydration; the precise amount depends on the level of activity, temperature, humidity, and other factors.[citation needed] With physical exertion and heat exposure, water loss increases and daily fluid needs will eventually increase as well. It is not fully clear how much water intake is needed by healthy people, although some experts assert that 8–10 glasses of water (approximately 2 liters) daily is the minimum to maintain proper hydration.[8] The notion that a person should consume eight glasses of water per day cannot be traced to a credible scientific source.[9] The effect of, greater or lesser, water intake on weight loss and on constipation is also still unclear.[10] The original water intake recommendation in 1945 by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Research Council read: â€Å"An ordinary standard for diverse persons is 1 milliliter for each calorie of food. Most of this quantity is contained in prepared foods.†[11] The latest dietary reference intake report by theUnited States National Research Council recommended, generally, (including food sources): 2.7 liters of water total for women and 3.7 liters for men.[12] Specifically, pregnant and breastfeeding women need additional fluids to stay hydrated. According to the Institute of Medicine—who recommend that, on average, women consume 2.2 litres and men 3.0 litres—this is recommended to be 2.4 litres (approx. 9 cups) for pregnant women and 3 litres (approx. 12.5 cups) for breastfeeding women since an especially large amount of fluid is lost during nursing.[13] For those who have healthy kidneys, it is somewhat difficult to drink too much water,[citation needed] but (especially in warm humid weather and while exercising) it is dangerous to drink too little. People can drink far more water than necessary while exercising, however, putting them at risk of water intoxication, which can be fatal. In particular large amounts of de-ionized water are dangerous. Normally, about 20 percent of water intake comes in food, while the rest comes from drinking water and assorted beverages (caffeinated included). Water is excreted from the body in multiple forms; including urine and feces, sweating, and by water vapor in the exhaled breath.

Saturday, January 4, 2020

Japanese Green Tea

Japanese tea is getting popular these days. This page helps you to learn how to pronounce the names of various Japanese teas. Ocha - Japanese tea in general Although cha means tea, it is usually called o-cha. O is a prefix of respect. Learn more about how to use o in Japanese words. How to Order Japanese Tea Ocha o kudasai. 㠁ŠèÅ' ¶Ã£â€šâ€™Ã£  Ã£   Ã£ â€¢Ã£ â€žÃ£â‚¬â€š) Ocha, onegaishimasu. 㠁ŠèÅ' ¶Ã£â‚¬ Ã£ Å Ã© ¡ËœÃ£ â€žÃ£ â€"㠁 ¾Ã£ â„¢Ã£â‚¬â€š This is how to order Japanese tea at Japanese restaurant. Both kudasai and onegaishimasu are used when making a request for items. Learn more about kudasai and onegaishimasu. The Japanese tea is complementary at most restaurants in Japan. Japanese Tea Pronunciation Here are the names of common Japanese teas. Click the links to hear the pronunciation. You might find it sounds monotone. This is because Japanese has a pitch accent unlike a stress accent in English. Matcha æŠ ¹Ã¨Å' ¶ Gyokuro 玉éÅ" ² Sencha ç…ŽèÅ' ¶ Bancha ç• ªÃ¨Å' ¶ Houjicha 㠁 »Ã£ â€ Ã£ ËœÃ¨Å' ¶ Genmaicha 玄ç ± ³Ã¨Å' ¶) Learn about each type of Japanese tea. Learn the pronunciation of other Japanese beverages. Trivia About Japanese Tea There is a matcha flavored Kit Kat, which is a limited version only available in Kyoto. Starbucks in Japan have a Matcha Latte just like the ones in North America. They also carry Sakura Steamed Milk and Sakura Frappuccino as spring specials. Sakura means cherry blossom.I find it is very Japanese to see Sakura Beverages on the menu. They remind me of Sakura-yu which is a tea-like drink made by steeping a salt-preserved cherry blossom in hot water. It is often served at weddings and other auspicious occasions. Bottled green tea (unsweetened) is a popular drink in Japan. You can easily find it in vending machines or convenience stores. Ochazuke is a simple dish which is basically Japanese tea poured over rice with savory toppings. Cha-soba is buckwheat noodles flavored with green tea powder. Matcha is also commonly used for sweets, such as cookies, cakes, chocolate, ice cream, Japanese sweets and so on. The Shizuoka prefecture has the largest production of green tea and it is considered the best tea in Japan.

Friday, December 27, 2019

The Role of a Journalist - 1307 Words

Role of Journalist Australian writer/journalist Karl Karus said it best when he said, â€Å"corruption is worse than prostitution. The latter might endanger the morals of an individual, the former invariably endangers the morals of the entire country.† For decades, the United States has been one the most notable countries to come under fire with reports of government corruption. During the dawn of the new millennium the Transparency Corruption began to publish their Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI), a culmination of assessments and opinion surveys by experts which rank countries based on their perceived corruption. In 2012, the U.S ranked 19 out of 174 countries. Its often questioned how this report would vary had it been published decades before when whistle blowers and journalist were striving to shed light onto government corruption in the 50s , 60s, and 70s. Throughout the history of the United States its been the responsibility of journalist and whistle blowers to report dishon esty and injustice created by those in power. In a letter to Virginia statesman Edward Carrington, President Thomas Jefferson shared his views on the press and government. The basis of our governments being the opinion of the people, the very first object should be to keep that right; and were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter. Its been thisShow MoreRelatedThe Role Of Journalists On The Media3097 Words   |  13 Pageson the news media to connect us to the entire world, which is why the role of journalists is essential. Journalists have the very important duty of reporting on current events accurately and objectively. Along with written text, pictures also tell a story, which presents a continuous ethical issue for many journalists. Although newspapers and magazines routinely publish photos, there are many ethical values that journalists must consi der before publishing those photos, such as the impact a photoRead MoreJournalists Played A Great Role During The Vietnam War Essay4155 Words   |  17 PagesIntroduction It is clear that journalists played a great role during the Vietnam War considering that they were source of advice and motivation during the war. Many journalists have been recognized due to their efforts during the war where there were radios that broadcasted thus addressing some issues that needed to be known by people. There several American soldiers who have been quoted mentioning their experiences during those times where journalists were heard on radios and newspapers. 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Referring to Saxon, D.’s case study, Syrian civil war stimulated citizen journalists’ willingness to get evolved in politics (Saxon, 2013). In four-and-a- half years of armed conflict, hot-blooded citizens who were behind the revolutions employed social media as a temporary press, contributing with their documentaries of the revolutionsRead More Citizen Journalism1587 Words   |  7 PagesJoan Cornell notes that the Internet democratizes the journalism which was in the hand of the few people (2003). The Internet makes the public access to information; at the same time, it creates the public to be journalists, opening blogs to put something new around on the Intern et. Many news websites like The Guardian, the Washington Post, CNN and MSNBC allows some personification. 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Examples of new media include internet forums, blogs, wikis, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Flickr. There can be no gainsaying that the distinct role of the media, aside from providing entertainment, is the dissemination of information to the general public. The purpose of this paper is to critically examine how the media influences politics. What are the sources of News in the US? According to

Wednesday, December 18, 2019

The Roles of Women in Death of a Salesman, by Arthur Miller

In his play Death of a Salesman, Arthur Miller uses â€Å"the common man as a fit subject for tragedy in the highest sense† (Lawrence, Trudeau and Ross Vol. 1) and failure in the accomplishment of the American. The play tends to recline more in the direction of masculinity where men’s sole role is to get a job and support the family and the woman be seen and ordered which brings out the idea of traditional gender roles at its best. Though this is the case, it is very evident that women played an important role in this play. Although every character in the served and had a main purpose, women served a major role not only as subjects of submission and satisfaction who helped define who the men really were in the 1940’s but also as elements of support and wisdom. Let’s first consider how the main character Willy viewed women and how this contributes to his character development. Willy Loman the head of the Loman family, is known to treat his wife Linda like a minor who can neither think nor make decisions on her own. From the beginning to the end of the play, he is seen as a person who hates to be objected but always wants Linda to be on his side regarding matters. An example of women’s role is seen when Linda and Willy were talking about their elder son Biff: LINDA: You shouldn’t have criticised him, Willy, especially after he just got off the train. You mustn’t lose your temper with him. WILLY: When the hell did I lose my temper? I simply asked him if he was making any money. IsShow MoreRelatedWomen’s Treatment in Death of a Salesman1463 Words   |  6 PagesWomen’s treatment in Death of a Salesman December 11, 2012 Abstract In our today’s men and women hold equal rights, however, in times prior to the 1950’s the majority of people would agree men held favorable positions and were said to be superior over women. 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